http://iet.metastore.ingenta.com
1887

Operation and control of a 2 GW wave-energy scheme

Operation and control of a 2 GW wave-energy scheme

For access to this article, please select a purchase option:

Buy article PDF
$19.95
(plus tax if applicable)
Buy Knowledge Pack
10 articles for $120.00
(plus taxes if applicable)

IET members benefit from discounts to all IET publications and free access to E&T Magazine. If you are an IET member, log in to your account and the discounts will automatically be applied.

Learn more about IET membership 

Recommend Title Publication to library

You must fill out fields marked with: *

Librarian details
Name:*
Email:*
Your details
Name:*
Email:*
Department:*
Why are you recommending this title?
Select reason:
 
 
 
 
 
IEE Proceedings A (Physical Science, Measurement and Instrumentation, Management and Education, Reviews) — Recommend this title to your library

Thank you

Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

The potential for sea-wave-energy exploitation is high in waters around the UK. Generating stations would typically be 2000 MW in rating, about 30 km long and be situated 10—15 km offshore, the energy being transmitted as electricity in submarine power cables. For such developments to be economic, a high degree of plant availability is necessary so that the maximum amount of energy can be converted and transmitted ashore. This requirement for high availability leads to the need for carefully designed protection and monitoring equipment. In addition, because the plant will be unmanned and because maintenance can be carried out only during short periods of the year, control, operating and monitoring philosophies must be developed, which may be quite different to those normally applied on land-based systems. In the paper, an approach is described which bases control, operating and maintenance around comprehensive condition monitoring of generating plant. Details are given of how information from such instrumentation can be used not only for health monitoring of plant, but also as an aid to operation and to scheduling and design of maintenance procedures.

References

    1. 1)
      • Girard, : French patent 349, 1799, , translated into English by A.E. Hidden.
    2. 2)
      • I. Glendenning . (1978) Energy from waves, Oceanology International 78.
    3. 3)
      • D. Mollison . The wave power resource around the British Isles. New Sci.
    4. 4)
      • R. Tornkvist . Ocean waves give energy. Tek. Tidskrift , 15 - 19
    5. 5)
      • HMSO Energy Paper 42 1980.
    6. 6)
      • Salter, S.H.: `The use of gyros as a reference frame in wave energy converters', Wave energy utilisation symposium, 22–24 June 1982, Trondheim, p. 99–115.
    7. 7)
      • J.R. Cure , J.A. Sullivan . Generation and transmission of electricity from wave energy schemes. IEE Conf. Publ. 192 , 135 - 142
    8. 8)
      • Mosche Ben-Basset , A. Freedy . Knowledge requirement and management in expert decision support systems for (military) situation assessment. IEEE Trans. , 479 - 490
    9. 9)
      • ‘An introduction to the ‘Sage’ expert system’. Knowledge Engineering Group, SPL International, 1982.
    10. 10)
      • H.W. Whittington , G. Buchanan . The performance of electronic systems in extreme environments. Proc. Inst. Meas. and Control
    11. 11)
      • Moody, G.W.: `The NEL oscillating water column:recent developments', Proceedings of 1st symposium on wave energy utilisation, 30–1 October–November 1979, Gothenburg, Sweden, Chalmers University of Technology.
http://iet.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1049/ip-a-1.1983.0061
Loading

Related content

content/journals/10.1049/ip-a-1.1983.0061
pub_keyword,iet_inspecKeyword,pub_concept
6
6
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address