http://iet.metastore.ingenta.com
1887

Self-healing in space environment

Self-healing in space environment

For access to this article, please select a purchase option:

Buy chapter PDF
$16.00
(plus tax if applicable)
Buy Knowledge Pack
10 chapters for $120.00
(plus taxes if applicable)

IET members benefit from discounts to all IET publications and free access to E&T Magazine. If you are an IET member, log in to your account and the discounts will automatically be applied.

Learn more about IET membership 

Recommend Title Publication to library

You must fill out fields marked with: *

Librarian details
Name:*
Email:*
Your details
Name:*
Email:*
Department:*
Why are you recommending this title?
Select reason:
 
 
 
 
 
Self-Healing Materials: From fundamental concepts to advanced space and electronics applications — Recommend this title to your library

Thank you

Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

The space environment is quite hostile to structural materials. The lifetime of space-craft is determined by the environmentally induced degradation of the structural materials. The self-healing systems discussed in this book chapter are applied mainly to polymer matrix-based materials. They usually include a variety of epoxies, polyimides, polysulfones and phenolics. In particular, cyanate-ester resins have been considered due to their lower hygrostrain/outgassing compared to the first generation of epoxy matrices. Carbon, glass and aramid fibres have also been used as reinforcing filaments within composite space structures. Aramid fibres are often employed as a `buffer' within a shielding system against damage induced by micrometeoroid impacts.

Chapter Contents:

  • 7.1 Challenges of the self-healing reaction in the space environment
  • 7.1 Challenges of the self-healing reaction in the space environment
  • 7.2 Approaches to space applications
  • 7.2 Approaches to space applications
  • 7.2.1 Self-healing with microcapsules
  • 7.2.1 Self-healing with microcapsules
  • 7.2.2 Self-healing with carbon nanotubes
  • 7.2.2 Self-healing with carbon nanotubes
  • 7.2.3 Self-healing of ceramics
  • 7.2.3 Self-healing of ceramics
  • 7.2.4 Self-healing for re-entry vehicles
  • 7.2.4 Self-healing for re-entry vehicles
  • 7.2.5 Self-healing foams
  • 7.2.5 Self-healing foams
  • 7.2.6 Integrating sensing within self-healing structures
  • 7.2.6 Integrating sensing within self-healing structures
  • 7.2.7 Self-healing paints
  • 7.2.7 Self-healing paints
  • 7.2.8 Self-healing of electrical insulation
  • 7.2.8 Self-healing of electrical insulation
  • 7.2.9 Foam layer surrounded conductor
  • 7.2.9 Foam layer surrounded conductor
  • 7.2.10 Other self-healing products
  • 7.2.10 Other self-healing products
  • 7.2.10.1 Photosil™ graded layer
  • 7.2.10.1 Photosil™ graded layer
  • 7.2.10.2 Self-healing using polyethylene-co-methacrylic acid
  • 7.2.10.2 Self-healing using polyethylene-co-methacrylic acid
  • 7.2.10.3 Self-repairing shape-memory alloy ribbons
  • 7.2.10.3 Self-repairing shape-memory alloy ribbons
  • 7.2.10.4 Multifunctional copolymers
  • 7.2.10.4 Multifunctional copolymers
  • 7.2.10.5 Self-healing composites with electromagnetic functionality
  • 7.2.10.5 Self-healing composites with electromagnetic functionality
  • 7.3 Materials ageing and degradation in space
  • 7.3 Materials ageing and degradation in space
  • 7.3.1 Mechanical ageing
  • 7.3.1 Mechanical ageing
  • 7.3.2 Meteorites and small debris
  • 7.3.2 Meteorites and small debris
  • 7.3.3 Atomic oxygen effects
  • 7.3.3 Atomic oxygen effects
  • 7.3.4 Vacuum effect
  • 7.3.4 Vacuum effect
  • 7.3.5 Space plasma
  • 7.3.5 Space plasma
  • 7.3.6 Thermal shock
  • 7.3.6 Thermal shock
  • 7.3.7 Outgassing
  • 7.3.7 Outgassing
  • References
  • References

Inspec keywords: maintenance engineering; filled polymers; carbon fibre reinforced plastics; glass fibre reinforced plastics; aerospace materials; aerospace safety; life testing; intelligent materials

Other keywords: glass fibres; aramid fibres; cyanate-ester resins; polyimides; lifetime; polysulfones; structural materials; environmentally induced degradation; polymer matrix-based materials; epoxies; self-healing systems; reinforcing filaments; micrometeoroid impacts; hygrostrain/outgassing; phenolics; C; space environment; carbon fibres

Subjects: Aerospace industry; Composite materials (engineering materials science); Polymers and plastics (engineering materials science); Other topics in aerospace; Testing; Engineering materials; Maintenance and reliability

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Self-healing in space environment, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/books/cs/pbcs070e/PBCS070E_ch7-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/books/cs/pbcs070e/PBCS070E_ch7-2.gif

Related content

content/books/10.1049/pbcs070e_ch7
pub_keyword,iet_inspecKeyword,pub_concept
6
6
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address