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Decentralised PEV charging coordination to absorb surplus wind energy via stochastically staggered dual-tariff schemes considering feeder-level regulations

Decentralised PEV charging coordination to absorb surplus wind energy via stochastically staggered dual-tariff schemes considering feeder-level regulations

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Wind energy curtailment has increasingly concerned the electric power industry. To absorb the surplus wind energy, a decentralised programme is presented via stochastically staggered dual tariffs for the coordination of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargers. The programme consists of two stages: day ahead and real time. In the day-ahead stage, two steps are performed. First, the dual-tariff schemes are identified at the transmission level based on a charging coordination integrated unit commitment (CCIUC) model. Second, they are adjusted at the feeder level via a security check and correction (SCC) algorithm to ensure bus voltages, feeder currents and losses within desired limits. The CCIUC model and SCC algorithm incorporate a novel aggregated charging load model to grasp the integrated knowledge of PEVs in reacting to dual-tariff signals in an ex ante manner, which avoids real-time iterations between PEVs and systems. In the real-time stage, the individual charging pattern is produced for cost minimisation at the charging device level by a novel local coordination model. Simulation results show that the proposed program enables: (i) enhanced efficiencies on absorbing surplus wind energy at the transmission level; (ii) well considerations on satisfying regulation requirements at the feeder level.

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